Revolution 9 Lies of Cats Icon

The Truth About Indoor Cats and Parasites

Think your "indoor" cat is safe from dangerous feline parasites? Take this short quiz to find out if your cat is at risk and how you can protect it from fleas, heartworms, roundworms (Toxocara cati), hookworms (Ancylostoma tubaeforme) and ear mites.

  1. Houseplant potting soil can give your cat roundworms.

    True    False

    Correct, it is TRUE: Many cats enjoy playing in the potted plants around the house, scattering dirt and dried leaves. But about 15 percent of commercial potting soil contains viable roundworm eggs,1 and your cat could ingest these eggs while grooming.

    Correct answer is TRUE: Many cats enjoy playing in the potted plants around the house, scattering dirt and dried leaves. But about 15 percent of commercial potting soil contains viable roundworm eggs,1 and your cat could ingest these eggs while grooming.

  2. Your family dog can bring fleas into your house, where they can infest your cat.

    True    False

    Correct, it is TRUE: Dogs can bring both fleas and parasite eggs or larvae into your home, putting your cat at risk for many common internal and external parasites.

    Correct answer is TRUE: Dogs can bring both fleas and parasite eggs or larvae into your home, putting your cat at risk for many common internal and external parasites.

  3. Sitting on the balcony still counts as "indoors."

    True    False

    Correct, it is FALSE: Every exposure to the outside world counts. Anytime an indoor cat sets foot onto a balcony, visits the garage, sits beside a screened window or takes a trip to the veterinarian in its carrier, it’s not indoors anymore—and it's exposed to increased risk of parasite infection.

    Correct answer is FALSE: Every exposure to the outside world counts. Anytime an indoor cat sets foot onto a balcony, visits the garage, sits beside a screened window or takes a trip to the veterinarian in its carrier, it’s not indoors anymore—and it's exposed to increased risk of parasite infection.

  4. Stalking after bugs or mice does not increase parasite risk.

    True    False

    Correct, it is FALSE: Critters like cockroaches, snails, slugs, earthworms and rodents are often carriers or hosts for many common internal and external parasites that threaten your cat. So cats skilled at mousing or "roach patrol" may catch a lot more than they bargained for!

    Correct answer is FALSE: Critters like cockroaches, snails, slugs, earthworms and rodents are often carriers or hosts for many common internal and external parasites that threaten your cat. So cats skilled at mousing or "roach patrol" may catch a lot more than they bargained for!

  5. Parasites can walk home with you on your shoes.

    True    False

    Correct, it is TRUE: Who can imagine what's tracked into your home every day on the bottom of your shoes? Even things that don't appear suspect—like basic mud or dirt—can carry eggs from parasites.

    Correct answer is TRUE: Who can imagine what's tracked into your home every day on the bottom of your shoes? Even things that don't appear suspect—like basic mud or dirt—can carry eggs from parasites.

  6. Doggy doors don't stay open long enough for feline parasites to get in.

    True    False

    Correct, it is FALSE: They can get in with mosquitoes, rodents and other pests. While they may be extremely unwanted guests, pests also play host to feline parasites.

    Correct answer is FALSE: They can get in with mosquitoes, rodents and other pests. While they may be extremely unwanted guests, pests also play host to feline parasites.

  7. Your cat's self-grooming is an effective parasite deterrent.

    True    False

    Correct, it is FALSE: Very false. Cats may spend up to 50 percent of their time grooming themselves, other animals or even you. But all that licking, all over the body—from whiskers to wherever—offers parasites a red-carpet welcome into cats' bodies.

    Correct answer is FALSE: Very false. Cats may spend up to 50 percent of their time grooming themselves, other animals or even you. But all that licking, all over the body—from whiskers to wherever—offers parasites a red-carpet welcome into cats' bodies.

  8. Cleaning litter boxes less than once a day can promote the spread of parasites.

    True    False

    Correct, it is TRUE: One health hazard for cats can be their very own litter box, especially if it’s not cleaned out every single day. Some feline intestinal parasites that live here can also cause disease in people. And as far as what dogs like to do with litter boxes—we're not going there!

    Correct answer is TRUE: One health hazard for cats can be their very own litter box, especially if it’s not cleaned out every single day. Some feline intestinal parasites that live here can also cause disease in people. And as far as what dogs like to do with litter boxes—we're not going there!

Even Indoor Cats are Susceptible to Parasitic Infections

Chances are that your cat's life includes at least one of the risk factors listed above. Ask your veterinarian about protecting your cat with REVOLUTION® (selamectin) today.

Find a REVOLUTION veterinarian near you:

Win a KitNipBox subscription

Enter now »

What’s important
to you and your cat?

Take the latest survey »